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Goodbye China

“I soon realized that no journey carries one far unless, as it extends into the world around us, it goes an equal distance into the world within" -Lillian Smith

rain 77 °F

Passport clutched tightly, I stood in the line marked "Foreigners." To the left and right lay countless rows similar to mine, intercultural streams of people flooding into one common ocean. An elderly Japanese woman, gray-headed and grasping her husband's arm stood behind me. To my left, a haggard Malaysian woman, anchored by shopping bags, wearily managed two squirming boys bent on escape. Streams and rivers of us, different in our origins, but all flowing toward the same place: outside China.

Jake and I shuffled through the border checkpoints into Macau, an area adjacent to Zhuhai. Like Hong Kong, Macau is a special administrative region of China. Lying on the western side of the Pearl River Delta, the territory was originally a Portuguese settlement during the 16th century. According to Wikipedia, the name is said to have derived from the Jyutping Temple built in 1448. The temple was dedicated to Matsu, goddess of fishermen and seafarers.

With successful industries in textiles and electronics, Macau is also known for its hotels, historical sites, resorts and casinos. With such a rich reputation, Jake and I couldn't help but plan a daytrip to the area.

View from the backseat of a taxi. In Macau, steering wheels are on the right and cars drive on the left side of the road.

View from the backseat of a taxi. In Macau, steering wheels are on the right and cars drive on the left side of the road.


The ruins of St. Paul's - one of many historical tourist sites.

The ruins of St. Paul's - one of many historical tourist sites.


The architecture was very intriguing, as it was a mix of Portuguese and Asian styles

The architecture was very intriguing, as it was a mix of Portuguese and Asian styles


As usual, we had little to no idea where we were.

As usual, we had little to no idea where we were.


The tourist streets were bright and beautiful once night enveloped the city.

The tourist streets were bright and beautiful once night enveloped the city.


Jake, while roaming the streets of Macau.

Jake, while roaming the streets of Macau.


Enjoying raspberry sorbet (or, as Jake called it, "sore-bit") and coffee icecream - an example of us succumbing to our Western desires.

Enjoying raspberry sorbet (or, as Jake called it, "sore-bit") and coffee icecream - an example of us succumbing to our Western desires.


A building in the heart of the tourist area.

A building in the heart of the tourist area.

Posted by rovingduo 00:31 Archived in China

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Comments

The city lit up looks so beautiful. To me, it is like China has different types of beauty. There is the geography- the land, the buildings, the people, etc. Keep taking more pictures. I love them!

by Beth Husky

Yes, beauty manifests itself in many forms. I'm glad you're enjoying the photos. It was a fun trip, although we had no idea where we were when we first crossed the border. So, we just hopped in a taxi & pointed to the most tourist-looking area on the map. Luckily, we chose well!

by rovingduo

Hey u two!!! Good to see these great pics of you!! Beautiful country. Poppy says "HI" miss you guys.

by Jolynn Thamert

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