A Travellerspoint blog

October 2010

The Adventure Continues...

We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open - Jawaharlal Nehru

sunny 86 °F

One defining characteristic of any adventure is its tendency to deviate from course. Tonight is our last night in China; due to personal reasons, our stay has been snipped short. But, rest assured, it has been an adventure we wouldn’t think of rewriting.

Below are photos from our last days in southern China.

Our Zhuhai apartment complex.

Our Zhuhai apartment complex.

Jake requested a photo with this specific tree.

Jake requested a photo with this specific tree.

As usual, a bright day in Zhuhai.

As usual, a bright day in Zhuhai.

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Many buildings in Zhuhai were being renovated.

Many buildings in Zhuhai were being renovated.

The area we lived in was quite empty compared to the rest of Zhuhai.

The area we lived in was quite empty compared to the rest of Zhuhai.

On the way to our favorite noodle shop.

On the way to our favorite noodle shop.

According to our friend, this building was part of a graveyard.

According to our friend, this building was part of a graveyard.

Since our converter is so heavy, it often slides out of the wall...Jake attempted to fix that problem.

Since our converter is so heavy, it often slides out of the wall...Jake attempted to fix that problem.

In Chinese hotels, you insert your keycard into the wall for electricity. Are there any hotels in America like this?

In Chinese hotels, you insert your keycard into the wall for electricity. Are there any hotels in America like this?

At our favorite dumpling restaurant.

At our favorite dumpling restaurant.

mmmm...

mmmm...

According to the visual instructions on this compressed towel, one must insert it into water before using it...does this make sense?

According to the visual instructions on this compressed towel, one must insert it into water before using it...does this make sense?

Take note of #2 (in the hotel elevator).

Take note of #2 (in the hotel elevator).

Light traffic in Guangzhou.

Light traffic in Guangzhou.

I wish American hotels included tea sets.

I wish American hotels included tea sets.

The drink I shall miss most: naicha (milk tea).

The drink I shall miss most: naicha (milk tea).

From the textbook the school asked us to use.

From the textbook the school asked us to use.

We plan on continuing this blog from the States with whatever adventures we encounter there. Keep checking back, and we'll keep posting.

"Sometimes I see myself as a child in a rain storm, running around trying to catch all the drops in his mouth. I long for your adventures to be like the raindrops the child saves and not those which crash to the ground" - unknown.

Posted by rovingduo 05:58 Archived in China Tagged adventure china guangzhou zhuhai Comments (1)

Mooncake

overcast 88 °F

The Mid-Autumn Festival, also known as the Moon Festival, is a celebration of harvest and abundance. Though dancing, feasting, and moon-gazing are important aspecst of the festival, the sharing and giving of mooncakes is perhaps the most notable practice.

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The most common type of mooncake is filled with lotus seed paste, though more contemporary versions may hold icecream, cream cheese, or even ham at their core. Since mooncakes are generally high in calories, some companies have even created fat-free versions of the traditional cake.

In the past, mooncake production could take as long as four weeks, though production is considerably quicker in modern times. It has become increasingly popular to present mooncakes as gifts to relatives and even business clients, sparking a desire for more high-end mooncake variations. On average, a box of four mooncakes may range from 10USD to 50USD, though those sold by prestigious hotels or restaurants exceed this range.

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Mooncakes are meant to be cut diagonally, into quarters, and then shared. Many include a salty egg yolk center symbolizing the full moon.

There are many legends surrounding the mooncake's history, though I will describe only two here.

The first folk tale is one rooted in history, during the Yuan Dynasty. According to legend, mooncakes were used by Ming revolutionaries to overthrow their Mongolian rulers. To spread word of their rebellion, special mooncakes were created with secret messages baked within. On the night of the festival, the attack took place and the rebels were victorious.

Another legend, as described by chinavoc.com, says, "Another legend explained the role of the Old Man on the Moon, the Divine Match-maker. The Chinese believed that marriages were made in Heaven but prepared on the moon. The Old Man on the Moon tied the feet of young men and women with red cords for marriage. Thus a maiden made offerings and prayed to him during the Mid-Autumn Festival, hoping that some day she would ride in the red bridal sedan chair."

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Jake and I recieved five boxes of mooncake throughout the course of the festival. Needless to say, we have consumed enough mooncake to last us at least until next autumn.

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In celebration of the festival, every teacher at our school received a large box stuffed with apples, oranges and grapes. Since there are two of us, we received two of these boxes. Our fridge has been filled with nothing but fruit for weeks.

To our readers, we wish you all a Happy Mid-Autumn!

Posted by rovingduo 21:52 Archived in China Tagged china living_abroad mid_autumn_festival moon_cake zhuhai Comments (4)

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